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New releases, Interviews & Stories from the world of Pro Audio

 “Meet Magoo, one of Australia’s top music producers and mixing engineers – a two-time ARIA award winning one, to boot. His work has helped shape the landscape of modern Australian music, with an impressive catalog of clients including Midnight Oil, Regurgitator, Art Vs Science, The Jungle Giants, Go Violets, Jeremy Neale, and more. Magoo has been spending less time of late in the world of production, but luckily we managed to catch him during an atypical week. Read on below for a journey through his world.

- https://musicindustryinsideout.com.au/

Lachlan ‘Magoo’ Goold is one of Australia’s most respected music producers and is known for pushing the envelope and bending the status quo when it comes to recording.

He’s currently lecturing at there brand new University of Southern Queensland campus in Caloundra on Kabi Kabi land.

He’s a published academic with a PhD and continues to create & mix music in his spare time. When it came time to outfit the new campus with monitoring ADAM Audio was his first choice and as a result numerous teaching labs were set up with A7X loudspeakers.

He had previously used them throughout his PhD research (results published here) and were chosen due to the need for honest mid-range reproduction and clear mix results in the top and bottom end.

“I guess the one piece of gear I couldn't do without is a good pair of monitors. That's the one thing that hasn't changed through all of it - you do need a decent pair of monitors.”

We asked Dr Goold about the process of creativity and where it intersects with the dynamic nature of technology.

The Changing Pace of Technology in the Music Industry

There is one compelling constant in my thirty years of making records: changing technology. So, is there a need to stay on top of the latest recording technology innovation?

In 1992, as a young 22-year old I had the privilege of recording demos for a band named Deguello at Red Zeds studio in Brisbane’s Albion. It’s hard to remember the exact details of what transpired that day, as I did record and mix four songs in, at a guess, a 15-20 hour session.

Being only my fourth ever recording session, I think the session went well, but one lesson I learnt that day went well beyond the studio we were working in.

Red Zeds studios had a growing reputation. It was not because it had high-end equipment or a large recording space (like some Brisbane studios). What it did have were two energetic engineers who were prepared to work above and beyond expectations, all in the name of delivering some kind of sonic apotheosis.

Jeff Lovejoy and I pushed prosumer quality equipment to its extreme and built a solid reputation in Brisbane for creating world-class recordings (well, that was our goal).

Red Zeds was a modest studio. Set a short distance away from five raucous rehearsal rooms, the meagre isolation of the studio did little to quell the drone created in the building.

There was a 1” 24 track Tascam tape machine and console. Over time you learnt to EQ the sound while recording to compensate for the sound you would hear back.

The people with romantic images of tape machines didn’t use this technology (MacDemaro excluded).

While the studio had around $30 000 worth of equipment, this was  entry-level at that time in the recording industry. As the notoriety of the studio grew, so did the equipment list. Jeff Lovejoy and I would make requests for new gear with the owner, Joe, and when he could afford it, he would succumb to our wishes, and we would find a new toy to play with.

Here is the first moral in this story. When this fresh piece of kit came, we would drool, interrogate and work out precisely what this magical box could do.

While I’m not talking about expensive gear here, what we did was learn how to get the most out of this new item.

There would be quite a wait (it seemed like that at the time) between new equipment purchases, which only allowed us to master the equipment we had further.

Over time, the studio grew to have some reasonably decent gear, including an automated AMEK console, an Otari 2” tape machine and 6 loaned Neve preamps that never seemed to be returned to their owner. 

Did we stay up-to-date with the latest technology? Well, yes and no.

The studio did grow naturally, meaning the studio only bought equipment when it could afford it (well, I can only assume).

Still, at that time, the latest equipment was beyond the reach of a small Brisbane studio, far from the record company coffers required to feed them.

As the studio’s stature grew, so did mine Jeff’s.  This allowed us to contribute to the studio equipment list. The most significant purchase for me was my AKAI S3000XL sampler. It cost $5000 in 1995 and was worth more than my car.

The sampler was equivalent to one stereo digital track. Of course, using small samples, you could get quite a bit done with the magic box, and it felt like it gave me an edge.

I’ve always liked to stay current with the  technology, but there’s a difference to buying every latest gadget or plug-in for manipulating sound.

While, I still would’ve been considered an early adopter of Pro Tools, I didn’t buy my first system until 2000. That’s 5 years of draining every last bit out of the AKAI S3000.

Ultimately, technology is literally the logic behind the technique of using a tool. Technology will not make the song you’re working on better. Technology does not fix chord progressions, melodies or lyrics.

The goal of song production is to enhance or create meaning in a song and this is readily forgotten. While technology can inspire novel sounds that build help your song stand out, it’s only a matter of time before that trick is widely available to everyone.

Finally, I’ll come back to the Deguello recording. Apart from the songs, the next most important parts of the recording studio are communication, friendships and trust. Music is one of human’s most fundamental parts of communication.

In fact, many academics (myself included) consider language a special type of music. Communicating well in the studio will build rapport, friendships, trust and ultimately make better music.

Music is communication.  Becoming a better communicator will be better for your studio practice than that plug-in that you may only use a few times.

On bass in that day all that time ago in 1992 was Federal Audio’s Chris Bosley. We’ve been involved in many recording projects and other adventures over the years, and I feel honoured to call him a friend.

While I have to confess that I’ve succumbed to gimmicky production in the past, my point here is that using the tools you have effectively is way more important than keeping up with the latest trend.

  • Dr Lachlan ‘Magoo’ Goold

https://magoosound.com/discography/

https://www.usc.edu.au/staff/dr-lachlan-goold

Read more

 “Meet Magoo, one of Australia’s top music producers and mixing engineers – a two-time ARIA award winning one, to boot. His work has helped shape the landscape of modern Australian music, with an impressive catalog of clients including Midnight Oil, Regurgitator, Art Vs Science, The Jungle Giants, Go Violets, Jeremy Neale, and more. Magoo has been spending less time of late in the world of production, but luckily we managed to catch him during an atypical week. Read on below for a journey through his world.

- https://musicindustryinsideout.com.au/

Lachlan ‘Magoo’ Goold is one of Australia’s most respected music producers and is known for pushing the envelope and bending the status quo when it comes to recording.

He’s currently lecturing at there brand new University of Southern Queensland campus in Caloundra on Kabi Kabi land.

He’s a published academic with a PhD and continues to create & mix music in his spare time. When it came time to outfit the new campus with monitoring ADAM Audio was his first choice and as a result numerous teaching labs were set up with A7X loudspeakers.

He had previously used them throughout his PhD research (results published here) and were chosen due to the need for honest mid-range reproduction and clear mix results in the top and bottom end.

“I guess the one piece of gear I couldn't do without is a good pair of monitors. That's the one thing that hasn't changed through all of it - you do need a decent pair of monitors.”

We asked Dr Goold about the process of creativity and where it intersects with the dynamic nature of technology.

The Changing Pace of Technology in the Music Industry

There is one compelling constant in my thirty years of making records: changing technology. So, is there a need to stay on top of the latest recording technology innovation?

In 1992, as a young 22-year old I had the privilege of recording demos for a band named Deguello at Red Zeds studio in Brisbane’s Albion. It’s hard to remember the exact details of what transpired that day, as I did record and mix four songs in, at a guess, a 15-20 hour session.

Being only my fourth ever recording session, I think the session went well, but one lesson I learnt that day went well beyond the studio we were working in.

Red Zeds studios had a growing reputation. It was not because it had high-end equipment or a large recording space (like some Brisbane studios). What it did have were two energetic engineers who were prepared to work above and beyond expectations, all in the name of delivering some kind of sonic apotheosis.

Jeff Lovejoy and I pushed prosumer quality equipment to its extreme and built a solid reputation in Brisbane for creating world-class recordings (well, that was our goal).

Red Zeds was a modest studio. Set a short distance away from five raucous rehearsal rooms, the meagre isolation of the studio did little to quell the drone created in the building.

There was a 1” 24 track Tascam tape machine and console. Over time you learnt to EQ the sound while recording to compensate for the sound you would hear back.

The people with romantic images of tape machines didn’t use this technology (MacDemaro excluded).

While the studio had around $30 000 worth of equipment, this was  entry-level at that time in the recording industry. As the notoriety of the studio grew, so did the equipment list. Jeff Lovejoy and I would make requests for new gear with the owner, Joe, and when he could afford it, he would succumb to our wishes, and we would find a new toy to play with.

Here is the first moral in this story. When this fresh piece of kit came, we would drool, interrogate and work out precisely what this magical box could do.

While I’m not talking about expensive gear here, what we did was learn how to get the most out of this new item.

There would be quite a wait (it seemed like that at the time) between new equipment purchases, which only allowed us to master the equipment we had further.

Over time, the studio grew to have some reasonably decent gear, including an automated AMEK console, an Otari 2” tape machine and 6 loaned Neve preamps that never seemed to be returned to their owner. 

Did we stay up-to-date with the latest technology? Well, yes and no.

The studio did grow naturally, meaning the studio only bought equipment when it could afford it (well, I can only assume).

Still, at that time, the latest equipment was beyond the reach of a small Brisbane studio, far from the record company coffers required to feed them.

As the studio’s stature grew, so did mine Jeff’s.  This allowed us to contribute to the studio equipment list. The most significant purchase for me was my AKAI S3000XL sampler. It cost $5000 in 1995 and was worth more than my car.

The sampler was equivalent to one stereo digital track. Of course, using small samples, you could get quite a bit done with the magic box, and it felt like it gave me an edge.

I’ve always liked to stay current with the  technology, but there’s a difference to buying every latest gadget or plug-in for manipulating sound.

While, I still would’ve been considered an early adopter of Pro Tools, I didn’t buy my first system until 2000. That’s 5 years of draining every last bit out of the AKAI S3000.

Ultimately, technology is literally the logic behind the technique of using a tool. Technology will not make the song you’re working on better. Technology does not fix chord progressions, melodies or lyrics.

The goal of song production is to enhance or create meaning in a song and this is readily forgotten. While technology can inspire novel sounds that build help your song stand out, it’s only a matter of time before that trick is widely available to everyone.

Finally, I’ll come back to the Deguello recording. Apart from the songs, the next most important parts of the recording studio are communication, friendships and trust. Music is one of human’s most fundamental parts of communication.

In fact, many academics (myself included) consider language a special type of music. Communicating well in the studio will build rapport, friendships, trust and ultimately make better music.

Music is communication.  Becoming a better communicator will be better for your studio practice than that plug-in that you may only use a few times.

On bass in that day all that time ago in 1992 was Federal Audio’s Chris Bosley. We’ve been involved in many recording projects and other adventures over the years, and I feel honoured to call him a friend.

While I have to confess that I’ve succumbed to gimmicky production in the past, my point here is that using the tools you have effectively is way more important than keeping up with the latest trend.

  • Dr Lachlan ‘Magoo’ Goold

https://magoosound.com/discography/

https://www.usc.edu.au/staff/dr-lachlan-goold

Read more

Dana Gehrman has managed to traverse the last two years of COVID disruption with enough gusto to release a new single (and an album to follow). This has been a trying time for artists and studios alike.

Dana started her musical journey studying at Brisbane’s QUT where she studied and completed a bachelor of Music. From there the long slow climb of open Mic nights and singer/songwriter gigs led her through America to her first independent album “Find a Way” (2019) featuring a full band of seasoned session musicians and guest performers.

The recording and release of her sophomore record has been a rocky affair - derailed by writer’s block and a worldwide pandemic (no less!). Heading to Yama-Nui Studios in the Sunshine Coast hinterland, Dana recorded an album of her favourite songs with producer Paully B at the controls.

Dana’s music has been described as perfect road trip music, with a vintage 70s sound rich in nostalgia rewinding the clock to the golden age of groove-laden funk and emotive soul music.

Throughout her career there’s been a constant background of ADAM Audio monitors.

From the trusted ADAM Audio A7s at QUT where she studied, Dana’s first album was recorded and mixed at Airlock Studios (S2X) and her second album at Yama-Nui (A7X). Her home writing setup currently features T5V monitors.

Your sound definitely harks back to an older era - the record sounds more like it was recorded in the 1970s than 2021. How important is that to your creative output?

I’m always drawn back to the sounds of records from that golden era of music. Yeah, I think it will always be a sound I strive for, and will influence my creative process and output. 

It seems that on one ‘side of the glass’ you’ll have vintage guitars & amps, leslie cabinets and mics - then for monitoring its regularly modern, highly accurate monitoring. Is this where the vintage vibe has to enter the modern world?

Ha, I suppose it depends what gear you have access to. But I want to do my best to have great sounding records, I love listening to music through a good set of headphones, hear all the nuances and hidden gems in a track, working with good quality monitors becomes important.

How did you go about recovering from writer’s block?

I find it easiest to write when I’m away from home, more importantly away from the daily grind. Less distractions, more mental space to reflect and allow the songs to flow. The pandemic hit just after my album release and really affected the ability to travel or even just escape the stresses and fears that came with the pandemic. I found it really difficult. I turned to listening to music I loved. Immersing myself in those “happy places” and using that space to create new song ideas. It also lead to the decision to record some of these tunes which have been such a big part of who I am.   

Why a Little Feat cover for your new single?

Their music resonates so strongly with me, the sounds, their lyric style – something I’ve tried to capture in my original music. They’ve been such a big part of my life. Singing their songs for so long, they start to feel like my own. The pandemic reinforced being grateful for the good times and the importance of doing what you love, taking those golden opportunities when they present themselves. I think this song encapsulates that. Felt like a right time, right song situation. I figured why the heck not.

How did you start making music? What is your motivation?

I’ve been a music fan all my life, it’s the only thing I ever wanted to do.   

 

Did spending so much time using ADAM audio monitors influence your decision to choose them for your studio?

I think when you find a sound you enjoy, something that makes your job easier; it makes for an easy decision.   

What’s next for Dana Gehrman?

We had too much fun in the studio to just record one Little Feat tune, so decided to just keep going for an album. I’m looking forward to some studio I have at Airlock to record some new originals this year too.  Hoping touring is back on the cards later this year too – I miss it so much. 

What projects are your currently working on?

Finishing a Little Feat album. Working on new songs for the next original DG album. I’m also working on a new duo with Danny Widdicombe who I’ve collaborated heavily with on previous DG projects.

What have been your most popular/well-known projects so far?

A collaboration with Tim Rogers (You Am I), a song called ‘Find Away’ which became the name of my previous album. A track written for me by Danny Widdicombe.   

What makes the perfect studio monitor for you? Which features and qualities are important for you when it comes to monitoring?

Great dynamic range and clarity. 

Where did you hear ADAM monitors for the first time? Can you recall your first impressions?

Recording my first single back in 2013…Sitting in the couch of the studio mixing room and experiencing such a broad spectrum sound with so much detail. It’s a good feeling.

Is there a lightbulb moment that happens when you have an idea? Do you have to be in a certain ‘zone’ to achieve that, and how do you get to that place?

Often it comes quickly, as soon as you pick up the guitar or often when doing some menial task and it comes to me. The most important part is taking the tie to get the idea down before it’s lost.

How do you know when a track/project/mix is ’finished’?

I think simply, it just feels good.

Name: Dana Gehrman

Country / City:  Australia / Brisbane

Bands / Projects:  Dana Gehrman

Website(s):  https://danagehrman.com/

Social Media: https://www.facebook.com/dana.gehrman 

Instagram:   https://www.instagram.com/danagehrman/

Bandcamp: https://danagehrman.bandcamp.com/merch

Read more

Dana Gehrman has managed to traverse the last two years of COVID disruption with enough gusto to release a new single (and an album to follow). This has been a trying time for artists and studios alike.

Dana started her musical journey studying at Brisbane’s QUT where she studied and completed a bachelor of Music. From there the long slow climb of open Mic nights and singer/songwriter gigs led her through America to her first independent album “Find a Way” (2019) featuring a full band of seasoned session musicians and guest performers.

The recording and release of her sophomore record has been a rocky affair - derailed by writer’s block and a worldwide pandemic (no less!). Heading to Yama-Nui Studios in the Sunshine Coast hinterland, Dana recorded an album of her favourite songs with producer Paully B at the controls.

Dana’s music has been described as perfect road trip music, with a vintage 70s sound rich in nostalgia rewinding the clock to the golden age of groove-laden funk and emotive soul music.

Throughout her career there’s been a constant background of ADAM Audio monitors.

From the trusted ADAM Audio A7s at QUT where she studied, Dana’s first album was recorded and mixed at Airlock Studios (S2X) and her second album at Yama-Nui (A7X). Her home writing setup currently features T5V monitors.

Your sound definitely harks back to an older era - the record sounds more like it was recorded in the 1970s than 2021. How important is that to your creative output?

I’m always drawn back to the sounds of records from that golden era of music. Yeah, I think it will always be a sound I strive for, and will influence my creative process and output. 

It seems that on one ‘side of the glass’ you’ll have vintage guitars & amps, leslie cabinets and mics - then for monitoring its regularly modern, highly accurate monitoring. Is this where the vintage vibe has to enter the modern world?

Ha, I suppose it depends what gear you have access to. But I want to do my best to have great sounding records, I love listening to music through a good set of headphones, hear all the nuances and hidden gems in a track, working with good quality monitors becomes important.

How did you go about recovering from writer’s block?

I find it easiest to write when I’m away from home, more importantly away from the daily grind. Less distractions, more mental space to reflect and allow the songs to flow. The pandemic hit just after my album release and really affected the ability to travel or even just escape the stresses and fears that came with the pandemic. I found it really difficult. I turned to listening to music I loved. Immersing myself in those “happy places” and using that space to create new song ideas. It also lead to the decision to record some of these tunes which have been such a big part of who I am.   

Why a Little Feat cover for your new single?

Their music resonates so strongly with me, the sounds, their lyric style – something I’ve tried to capture in my original music. They’ve been such a big part of my life. Singing their songs for so long, they start to feel like my own. The pandemic reinforced being grateful for the good times and the importance of doing what you love, taking those golden opportunities when they present themselves. I think this song encapsulates that. Felt like a right time, right song situation. I figured why the heck not.

How did you start making music? What is your motivation?

I’ve been a music fan all my life, it’s the only thing I ever wanted to do.   

 

Did spending so much time using ADAM audio monitors influence your decision to choose them for your studio?

I think when you find a sound you enjoy, something that makes your job easier; it makes for an easy decision.   

What’s next for Dana Gehrman?

We had too much fun in the studio to just record one Little Feat tune, so decided to just keep going for an album. I’m looking forward to some studio I have at Airlock to record some new originals this year too.  Hoping touring is back on the cards later this year too – I miss it so much. 

What projects are your currently working on?

Finishing a Little Feat album. Working on new songs for the next original DG album. I’m also working on a new duo with Danny Widdicombe who I’ve collaborated heavily with on previous DG projects.

What have been your most popular/well-known projects so far?

A collaboration with Tim Rogers (You Am I), a song called ‘Find Away’ which became the name of my previous album. A track written for me by Danny Widdicombe.   

What makes the perfect studio monitor for you? Which features and qualities are important for you when it comes to monitoring?

Great dynamic range and clarity. 

Where did you hear ADAM monitors for the first time? Can you recall your first impressions?

Recording my first single back in 2013…Sitting in the couch of the studio mixing room and experiencing such a broad spectrum sound with so much detail. It’s a good feeling.

Is there a lightbulb moment that happens when you have an idea? Do you have to be in a certain ‘zone’ to achieve that, and how do you get to that place?

Often it comes quickly, as soon as you pick up the guitar or often when doing some menial task and it comes to me. The most important part is taking the tie to get the idea down before it’s lost.

How do you know when a track/project/mix is ’finished’?

I think simply, it just feels good.

Name: Dana Gehrman

Country / City:  Australia / Brisbane

Bands / Projects:  Dana Gehrman

Website(s):  https://danagehrman.com/

Social Media: https://www.facebook.com/dana.gehrman 

Instagram:   https://www.instagram.com/danagehrman/

Bandcamp: https://danagehrman.bandcamp.com/merch

Read more


Sonarworks have re-packaged their insanely popular speaker/headphone calibration software. Its a little smaller and more eco-friendly than the larger packaging. The full Sound ID Version (with Mic) will come in the same-sized box as the XREF Measurement Mic by itself - its clearly labelled though.

Sound ID New Box

Sonarworks' Sound ID Reference software at a glance:

Mix With Confidence- Stop second-guessing yourself and trust every decision.

Reference Standard - The only market solution providing ultimate accuracy for consistent reference sound between your speakers and headphones.

Perfect Translation - Create music that sounds great on phones, laptops, earbuds, or wherever else its played.

Improved Collaboration - Get only relevant feedback by working on the same reference sound regardless of distance or the gear you have.

Work From Anywhere - Seamlessly switch between speakers, headphones, and rooms. You’ll hear a flat, consistent sound wherever you go.

Finish Tracks Faster - Make better decisions and spend less time fixing mistakes.

Read more

Sonarworks have re-packaged their insanely popular speaker/headphone calibration software. Its a little smaller and more eco-friendly than the larger packaging. The full Sound ID Version (with Mic) will come in the same-sized box as the XREF Measurement Mic by itself - its clearly labelled though.

Sound ID New Box

Sonarworks' Sound ID Reference software at a glance:

Mix With Confidence- Stop second-guessing yourself and trust every decision.

Reference Standard - The only market solution providing ultimate accuracy for consistent reference sound between your speakers and headphones.

Perfect Translation - Create music that sounds great on phones, laptops, earbuds, or wherever else its played.

Improved Collaboration - Get only relevant feedback by working on the same reference sound regardless of distance or the gear you have.

Work From Anywhere - Seamlessly switch between speakers, headphones, and rooms. You’ll hear a flat, consistent sound wherever you go.

Finish Tracks Faster - Make better decisions and spend less time fixing mistakes.

Read more

Weight Tank has released a new updated version of its WT-72 tube microphone preamp and DI.

Best known for their use at Abbey Road on Beatles albums, original V72 amplifier modules had a factory set fixed gain of 34 dB (modified to 40 dB at Abbey Road). With further modification, they could be set to even higher amounts of gain.

Other than input or output attenuation, it is difficult to change audio level running through the modules on-the-fly.

“I always felt that a V72-style amplifier could be designed in a way that could use input attenuation, but also feedback manipulation to change gain within the actual amplifier,” says Locomotive owner Eric Strouth.

“This can help decrease the noise floor at almost all gain settings and keep the AC and DC feedback of the original design intact—but this poses a big problem. When changing amplifier gain with a switch, huge transient pops would occur, like a gun going off in your monitors. Not the best for your gear or hearing! Designing a circuit that could do the gain changing and deal with the side effects was challenging.”

Ultimately, a circuit design with muting capabilities was the answer. In the new Weight Tank WT-72, each time the user rotates the gain knob, the output mutes, the gain is changed and then the output is un-muted, all with the loud pops eliminated.

“With this new switching system, the WT-72 is able to offer the familiar frequency response and overall performance of the original at each of the 10 gain settings, all the way up 56 dB of gain,” says Strouth, “and it still has the character of the previous WT-72, but the lower noise floor is just icing on the cake.”

Check out the new WT72 Rev C here.

Read more

Weight Tank has released a new updated version of its WT-72 tube microphone preamp and DI.

Best known for their use at Abbey Road on Beatles albums, original V72 amplifier modules had a factory set fixed gain of 34 dB (modified to 40 dB at Abbey Road). With further modification, they could be set to even higher amounts of gain.

Other than input or output attenuation, it is difficult to change audio level running through the modules on-the-fly.

“I always felt that a V72-style amplifier could be designed in a way that could use input attenuation, but also feedback manipulation to change gain within the actual amplifier,” says Locomotive owner Eric Strouth.

“This can help decrease the noise floor at almost all gain settings and keep the AC and DC feedback of the original design intact—but this poses a big problem. When changing amplifier gain with a switch, huge transient pops would occur, like a gun going off in your monitors. Not the best for your gear or hearing! Designing a circuit that could do the gain changing and deal with the side effects was challenging.”

Ultimately, a circuit design with muting capabilities was the answer. In the new Weight Tank WT-72, each time the user rotates the gain knob, the output mutes, the gain is changed and then the output is un-muted, all with the loud pops eliminated.

“With this new switching system, the WT-72 is able to offer the familiar frequency response and overall performance of the original at each of the 10 gain settings, all the way up 56 dB of gain,” says Strouth, “and it still has the character of the previous WT-72, but the lower noise floor is just icing on the cake.”

Check out the new WT72 Rev C here.

Read more